Video: How We Think About Death And Honor Life

It is long been observed that it is not so much death that scares people, but the act of dying. Whereas the moment of our demise is, far as we can tell, painless, the hours, days, or even months leading up to that point can be painful in both a physical and emotional sense.

To that end, palliative care expert and physician BJ Miller leads a powerful TEDTalk that challenges us to think about how we handle those approaching death — namely, by making the medical system less focused on curing diseases and more oriented towards the overall wellness of patients. That means providing more comfort, dignity, and even “play” to the lives of the dying.

The seminar is well worth viewing in its entirety below.

To read a transcript of the above TED Talk, click here.

Given the rapidly growing ranks of the world’s elderly, who will make up the bulk of those requiring palliative care, Miller’s point could not be any more salient. I imagine that as populations around the world continue to age, matters of death and how we ease into it will become more prevalent topics of discussion.

What are your thoughts?

What Makes the Human Brain So Special

If have about thirteen minutes to spare, I recommend checking out this fascinating TED Talk by neuroscientist Suzana Herculano-Houzel, who discovered a new way to count the brain’s neurons — and subsequently unveiled some curious characteristics. (If you have trouble viewing the embedded video below, click here.)

My timing for sharing this lecture is pretty apt, given the recent discovery that the brain has an unfathomably large capacity for storing data, equal to roughly one petabyte. To put that in perspective, Gizmodo notes:

A good analogy is the total amount of data amassed at the U.S. Library of Congress, which is about 235 terabytes. One petabyte is about four times that. Put yet another way, one petabyte is enough to store the DNA of the entire population of the United States twice over. So our brains may not have the equivalent storage capacity of the entire Web, but it’s still a huge data reservoir.

It is easy to take for granted just how amazing our brains are.

 

Video — The Transformative Power of Classical Music

As I write this post, I am listening to a compilation of classical music that includes such greats as Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, and  Tchaikovsky. Rarely do I feel more focused, motivated, and at peace than when I indulge in such music. It has helped me endure many of my darkest or most stressful moments, helping to both rouse my spirits and soothing my soul (in fact, work has never been better since I made a point to listen almost exclusively to classical music — just a correlation to be sure, but still a strong one).

The following TED Talk by British-born composer Benjamin Zander takes a delightful look at the power of classical music, not just in terms of its technical and artistic qualities, but with regards to its impact on one’s thoughts, emotions, and soul. As he sees it, classical music cultivates and unlocks our love for all new possibilities, new experiences, new connections. It is an enchanting argument I am inclined to agree with, both from experience and his video.

While we are on the subject of classical music, you can find a downloadable album of 99 classical music pieces for just $5.99 on Amazon (the series also has 99-track albums for a number of other classical greats, such as Chopin, each ranging in price from $4.99 to $6.99 as of this post). My moral and productivity at work have never been greater!

 

 

 

 

The Most Important Lesson From 83,000 Brain Scans

Daniel Amen is an American psychiatrist and brain disorder specialist who is a strong advocate of utilizing single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as a diagnostic tool for better identifying and treating mental illnesses. In the following TED Talk, he discusses his research involving the use of SPECT (including several touching success stories resulting from its application) and highlights its importance in improving the efficacy of psychiatric treatment.

Personally, I found Amen’s points to be compelling and reasonable. The growing prominence of psychiatric problems in our society, coupled with issues of inaccurate diagnosis and inadequate treatment, makes his argument for the wider use of SPECT seem self-evidently true.

However, after doing some research, I dug up quite a lot serious skepticism and criticism towards Amen’s claims, as well as his professional endeavors (apparently, he hawks a lot of pseudoscience while making hefty profits from his private practice). Much of the controversy and debate is cited and expanded upon in this article from Science Based Medicine, a source I deeply trust.

Personally, I remain undecided, as I just came across Amen and his subsequent detractors. I will have to look into these matters more deeply when I have the time, but I invite you all to see the video, read the criticism, and decide for yourselves. As always, feel free to weigh in with your thoughts here. Thanks for reading.

The Man Who Cultivated Malala

By now most readers no doubt know of Malala Yousafzai, the brave teen activist who advocated for education and women’s rights in a Taliban-dominated part of Pakistan before nearly dying  at the hands of a Taliban gunman. The assassination attempt — which has done little to silence her — rightly elevated her to international attention while highlighting the plight of women and girls in Pakistan and the brave efforts of reformers like Malala to change the status quo.

Now the man who has been most fundamental to Malala’s courage, her father Ziauddin, is entering the spotlight for his uniquely progressive role in helping his daughter realize her remarkable potential on her own terms. “Why is my daughter so strong?” Yousafzai asks. “Because I didn’t clip her wings.” A simple but profound point about the role that parents should play in their children’s lives, especially within societies that seek to oppress and stifle them.

Check out his incredible and inspiring TED Talk below. It’s well worth your time.

It’s beautiful to see how much this son and daughter team have managed to defy stereotypes and societal pressure to become mutually reinforcing and supportive of each other, leading as much by example as through activism. I can’t wait to see what amazing things they’ll accomplish in the future, especially as Malala begins to realize her dream of continuing her education and no doubt learning more about how she can help the world.