Facebook Isn’t Popular in Only a Handful of Countries

Russia and China are the only countries to have their own social media platforms be more popular than an American one: V Kontakte and Odnoklassniki (part of “Russia’s Google”, Mail.ru) and QZone (owned by China’s tech giant, Tencent, the world’s largest gaming and social media company). However, China bans most U.S. platforms, and only Russia’s are popular abroad (albeit in the Russian-speaking former Soviet bloc).

Otherwise, Facebook is very clearly the leading social network by a wide margin, dominating 152 out of 167 countries analyzed (91% of the planet).

Source: www.vincos.it/world-map-of-social-networks/

Death in the Social Media Age

Social media has allowed average people to establish a persistent and indefinite presence on the internet, namely through profiles like Facebook. It’s strange to imagine that after we pass away, all these photos, posts, and other means of expression will otherwise remain permanently recorded. It can also be eerie when someone has died unexpectedly, leaving you with a timeline of last words and activities.
 
I’ve also seen the profiles of deceased people become shrines of sorts, with many loved ones browsing through them to capture the essence of their departed. I’m not sure of what to make of that — on the one hand, it’s nice to be able to retain so much of a person long after they die; but on the other hand, it may make it more difficult to let go.
 
I can imagine that very soon, it may become common for someone to mention in their will what should be done with their various social media profiles.

What are your thoughts and experiences with this?

 

Is Facebook (And Other Social Media) Good For Us?

Read this article in the Atlantic and judge for yourselves. Commentary is welcomed, as always.

Personally, I think that Facebook, like almost everything else in life, is what you make of it, and that it may merely be amplifying pre-existing social and psychological problems. It’ll have different effects on different people, and I recall that many people rely on social media, especially Tumblr, as somewhat of a remedy for their real-life problems – a place to escape, vent, seek advice, or just pass the time (not that social media should be a substitute for things like therapy or counseling, with respect to more serious issues).

Of course, this doesn’t mean we shouldn’t explore the potential for individual and societal harm. All technological and social developments have some sort of ambivalent effect on us. The key is to adapt to them, and most of the time that’s something we learn to deal with as we go along. Luckily, we have both the means and awareness to think ahead about these fast-paced developments. But if anyone looks at the history of almost any innovation – even such wholesome things as, say, novels – and you’ll find the usual anxieties about the potential for harm (especially as far as the youth are concerned).

While we’re on the subject, there has also been a lot of discussion about the effect of social media on human behavior and psychology. Again, this is to be expected, given that any new technology, especially in the area of communication, tends to have profound effect on how we think, interact, and identify with others.

NPR’s Morning Edition had a brief but fascinating piece on the subject some time ago. It’s obviously not the first to explore the influence of social media, and it most certainly won’t be the last. Though it deals specifically with Facebook, a lot of the observations can apply to Tumblr, Twitter, and other social media as well. Below is the transcript:

Posting on Facebook is an easy way to connect with people, but it also can be a means to alienate them. That can be particularly troublesome for those with low self-esteem.

People with poor self-image tend to view the glass as half empty. They complain a bit more than everyone else, and they often share their negative views and feelings when face to face with friends and acquaintances.

Researchers at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, wondered whether those behavior patterns would hold true online. They published their findings in the journal Psychological Science.

“People with low self-esteem tend to be very cautious and self-protective,” says one of the researchers, psychologist Amanda L. Forest. “It’s very important to them to gain others’ acceptance and approval. … So given that, we thought people with low self-esteem might censor what they’re saying to present a kind of positive and likable self-image on Facebook.”

She and fellow psychologist Joanne V. Wood collected the 10 most recent status updates from 177 undergraduate volunteers who had completed the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. A team of objective “readers” then rated the updates based on how positive or negative they were.

People with low self-esteem posted far more negative updates than those with high self-esteem. Forest says they described a host of unhappy sentiments, from seemingly minor things like having a terrible day or being frustrated with class schedules to more extreme feelings of rage and sorrow.

Intuitively, this makes sense: being bombarded with the apparent success and happiness of everyone else will only intensify your already low self-worth. Speaking from personal experience, people with low self-esteem generally have a tendency to overstate the joy of others, feeling as if the rest of the world is normal and well-adjusted while they struggle to get by. Facebook only amplifies this perception further, given that being in large groups – be they physical or digital – exacerbates the sense of loneliness that is intrinsic to many emotional and mental problems.

But what about if you don’t suffer from low self-confidence and the like?

On the other hand, those with a healthy dose of self-esteem often wrote about being happy, excited or thankful for something.

When researchers asked people rating the updates if they wanted to get to know those who wrote the negative posts, the answer was a resounding no.

Researchers even looked at actual Facebook friends because, Forest says, “you might think that a real friend would care if you’re expressing negativity.” It turned out actual friends didn’t like the negative posts, either. The posts actually backfired, neither winning the author new friends nor generating good feelings.

As the saying goes, “laugh and the world laughs with you, cry and you cry alone.” People have a natural aversion to negativity, which is what makes depression even more frustrating: not only do you have to struggle with your own internal emotional problems, but you’re unable to express yourself or seek out help without feeling burdensome or annoying.

This kind of rejection might also have to do with the nature of Facebook, which many people view as the wrong place to share personal or emotional matters. Even though social media has become so ingrained in the everyday lives of millions of people, there is still a widespread perception that because it’s the internet, it’s not a serious and appropriate venue for communicating such things. Plus, there is the usual inclination to assume that such comments are merely “attention baiting.”

But this issue gets trickier.

Even for people with high self-esteem, aspects of Facebook can be difficult, according to mental health professionals — for example, if other people get lots of “likes” or thumbs-up on their posts and yours don’t, or if friends post photos that you’re not in.

The bottom line for everyone — no matter how much self-esteem you have — is to be selective about what you put on Facebook, says Dr. Mike Brody, a psychiatrist at the University of Maryland and in private practice. Especially since posts live in cyberspace forever.

Exactly. I’d also add that people need to build up their confidence and work on their insecurities. If not, avoid Facebook (or any other site for that matter) that will make you feel more unhappy than you already are.

Keep in mind that social media, like most things, is a double-edged sword: for all it’s faults, Facebook and its ilk is great at connecting you to like-minded people. There exist groups and forums where people with certain interests, conditions, or ideas can come together and relate. You just have to learn how to adapt to the web and make the most of its benefits while avoiding the pitfalls as best you can.

Death in the Age of Social Media

Social media has made the ritual of death pretty interesting. When we die, we will be among the first generation to leave behind a unique timeline of our lives, in the form of photos, biographical information, status updates, and interactions with others. Our profiles will become shrines for our loved ones to leave condolences or see a time capsule of our time on this Earth (I’ve already seen this happen with the Facebook profiles of several deceased friends and acquaintances).

Of course, this would raise another interesting thought: do we plan on keeping our social media profiles indefinitely? Will there be a point where we’ll just grow out of it, or will it continue to mature with us until we die? It’s strange to think that we’ll have this constant (albeit wildly variable) record of our lives following us as we age.

Is Facebook Good For Your Self-Esteem?

There’s a lot of discussion about the effect of social media on human behavior and psychology. That’s to be expected, given that any new technology, especially in the area of communication, tends to have profound effect on how we think, interact, and identify with others.

NPR’s Morning Edition had a brief but fascinating piece on the subject. It’s not the first to explore the influence of social media, and it most certainly won’t be the last. Below is the transcript:

Posting on Facebook is an easy way to connect with people, but it also can be a means to alienate them. That can be particularly troublesome for those with low self-esteem.

People with poor self-image tend to view the glass as half empty. They complain a bit more than everyone else, and they often share their negative views and feelings when face to face with friends and acquaintances.

Researchers at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, wondered whether those behavior patterns would hold true online. They published their findings in the journal Psychological Science.

“People with low self-esteem tend to be very cautious and self-protective,” says one of the researchers, psychologist Amanda L. Forest. “It’s very important to them to gain others’ acceptance and approval. … So given that, we thought people with low self-esteem might censor what they’re saying to present a kind of positive and likable self-image on Facebook.”

She and fellow psychologist Joanne V. Wood collected the 10 most recent status updates from 177 undergraduate volunteers who had completed the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. A team of objective “readers” then rated the updates based on how positive or negative they were.

People with low self-esteem posted far more negative updates than those with high self-esteem. Forest says they described a host of unhappy sentiments, from seemingly minor things like having a terrible day or being frustrated with class schedules to more extreme feelings of rage and sorrow.

Furthermore, I don’t think being bombarded with the apparent success and happiness of everyone else will improve your own self-worth. Speaking from experience, people with low self-esteem often have a tendency to overstate the joy of others, feeling as if the rest of the world is normal and well-adjusted while they struggle to get by. Facebook only amplifies this perception further, as being in large groups – be they physical or digital – exacerbates the sense of loneliness endemic to many emotional and mental problems.

But what about if you don’t suffer from low self-confidence and the like?

On the other hand, those with a healthy dose of self-esteem often wrote about being happy, excited or thankful for something.

When researchers asked people rating the updates if they wanted to get to know those who wrote the negative posts, the answer was a resounding no.

Researchers even looked at actual Facebook friends because, Forest says, “you might think that a real friend would care if you’re expressing negativity.” It turned out actual friends didn’t like the negative posts, either. The posts actually backfired, neither winning the author new friends nor generating good feelings.

As the saying goes, “laugh and the world laughs with you, cry and you cry alone.” People have a natural aversion to negativity, which is what makes depression even more frustrating: not only do you have to struggle with your own internal emotional problems, but you’re unable to express yourself or seek out help without feeling burdensome or annoying.

This kind of rejection might also have to do with the nature of Facebook, which many people view as the wrong place to share personal or emotional matters. Even though social media has become so ingrained in the everyday lives of millions of people, there is still a widespread perception that because it’s the internet, it’s not a serious and appropriate venue for communicating such things. Plus, there is the usual inclination to assume that such comments are merely “attention baiting.”

But this issue gets trickier.

Even for people with high self-esteem, aspects of Facebook can be difficult, according to mental health professionals — for example, if other people get lots of “likes” or thumbs-up on their posts and yours don’t, or if friends post photos that you’re not in.

The bottom line for everyone — no matter how much self-esteem you have — is to be selective about what you put on Facebook, says Dr. Mike Brody, a psychiatrist at the University of Maryland and in private practice. Especially since posts live in cyberspace forever.

Exactly. I’d also add that people need to build up their confidence and work on their insecurities. If not, avoid Facebook, or any other site for that matter, that will make you feel more unhappy then you already are. Keep in mind that social media, like most things, is a double-edged sword: for all it’s faults, Facebook and its ilk is great at connecting you to like-minded people. There exist groups and forums where people with certain interests, conditions, or ideas can come together and relate. You just have to learn how to adapt to the web and make the most of its benefits, while avoiding the pitfalls as best you can.