Final Christmas Reflections

As a child I always saw holidays, most of all Christmas, as something magical, even when discounting the mythology of Santa Claus. Such a joyous and festive time seemed otherworldly, almost as if the entire world – and all its horror – paused for just a few days to allow everyone a happy respite. When you’re caught up in having a good time, you forget all the things that worry you, and all the bad in the world – you escape physically, mentally, and emotionally.

Such a sentiment still lingers in me to this day. When I’m having a good time, I like to think that everyone else is too. I’d like to think that time has stopped while we all engage in festivities, spend time with loved ones, and reinforce one another’s good spirits. This perception (or wish) isn’t limited to Christmas or other holidays: it’s any occasion or moment when I’m content, and everything and everyone around me seems to be as well. Otherwise, it’s hard to enjoy yourself when others can’t – it brings you down, and drags you back to a more unpleasant reality.

I for one feel guilty or undeservedly privileged – why should I have fun while others suffer, many of them good and honest folks? How can I enjoy myself and indulge in rich-world pleasantries while the majority of the world is mired in poverty, disease, and injustice? Even in my own community, there are thousands out in the streets or barely scrapping by, and many more working during what would otherwise be a vacation. I’m having fun, and they’re toiling, struggling, or both.

I don’t like to imagine all these bad things still going on while I enjoy myself. I don’t like to accept that wars still continue, people still clock into their low-wage jobs, and personal tragedies are befalling millions even on a day when we’re supposed to be having a magical time (even a nonbeliever like me can’t shake away that traditional outlook, as my prior post explains). We all deserve a chance to enjoy  ourselves and just take a break, if only briefly.

A little bit before Christmas Eve, two bombs went off in Syria, killing over two dozen people, and reminding me how thousands are still dying in the name of freedom. A similar tragedy befell Iraq around the same time, killing scores more. Nigeria began its Christmas day with a gruesome terorrist attack against a church, just as devout worshipers were leaving mass (several other minor but still fatal attacks occurred concurrently). These are just a handful of the horrors that claim our fellow humans at an unending rate – it stops for nothing. The planet still turns, and a fun holiday in one part of the world, for just a handful of the globe’s denizens, means little else to most people. If only it still meant for me what it did as a child.

I still like to reflect on the positive acts that nonetheless transpire concurrently, often unnoticed: acts of charity or justice, to name a few. I know there’s still a lot of good in the world, and that even the most oppressed and impoverished people manage, through sheer willpower and perseverance, to care a little happiness for themselves whenever they can. But it’s small comfort compared to the magnitude of needless human suffering that still goes on despite our our presumed technological, medical, and ethical advancements. I’m reminded of this video my friend posted on my Facebook group not along ago:

I don’t mean to be such a downer so soon after the holidays. I had a very pleasant season, and one of the best parties in years. I’m not at all glum today, despite the somber reflections. I simply feel a bit unfilled now that a nostalgically happy time is behind me, and I’m forced to confront the real world once more, even though as a news junkie, I still got wind of these tragic events (albeit with a level of cognitive dissonance). I just wish more of the world could share in my good fortune. If there’s one silver lining to all this, it’s how strongly it reminds me to be grateful for all that I have, you readers included.

I hope everyone has a great holiday, and better still, a great life. Never forget what and who you have.

2 comments on “Final Christmas Reflections

  1. I know how you feel. I gave up on Christmas cards in 2003; I sent out a very morbid card (about war) and haven’t sent out cards since.

    As crazy as it sounds, peace is the number one reason I am participating in this blogging world. I believe in the power of communicating; sharing with and listening to people from all walks of life from all over the world and trying to find some common ground.

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